Elderberry (Sambucus nigra subsp. canadensis) Fruit, Whole, Freeze Dried, Certified Organic, Premium Harvest

USA. Elderberry (Sambucus nigra subsp. canadensis) Fruit, Whole, Freeze Dried, Certified Organic, Premium Harvest

Common names: Pie Elder, American Elder, Black Elderberry, Elder-blow, Sweet Elder

Family: Adoxaceae

Sambucus nigra subspecies canadensis are shrubs native to the eastern US, from Florida to east Texas, and Wisconsin to Maine and Nova Scotia, and grow ten to fifteen feet high. Their preferred habitats are sunny, fertile locations, both wet and dry.

These delicious berries are grown by a dedicated cooperative of farmers, based in Minnesota. Elderberries—both the European S. nigra and American S. canadensis varieties, which are used in the same ways—have long been heralded for their antioxidant, antiviral, and immune supporting properties.

Almost all of the Elderberries and Elderberry products available in the US are imported from Europe, where the wild harvested fruit is considered certified organic. The farmed American Elderberries are sweeter than the European species, contain lower levels of cyanogenic glycosides, with higher levels of nutrients than most wild harvested berries.

Freeze drying preserves more than 95% of the beneficial phytochemicals; a single cup of freeze-dried berries is equivalent to more than two cups of fresh or frozen fruit. They're great for salad toppings, cereals, and smoothies, and can easily be crushed into powder.

Elderberry syrup is a traditional children's remedy during the cold and flu season. Elderberries have also been given as a mild laxative (yet also reportedly helpful for diarrhea), a diuretic, to increase perspiration, and as a remedy for various conditions including hay fever, nerve pains, rheumatism, and cancer. Recent research also suggests a role for Elderberry's antioxidant properties in alleviating complications of diabetes.

The research on Elderberry's antiviral, immune-enhancing properties is some of the most conclusive of its kind, as it includes well-controlled clinical studies on human subjects, in addition to the in vitro experiments which are often cited in support of such activities. (Note, there is absolutely no evidence to support speculation regarding Elderberry playing any role in stimulating harmful immune dysfunction such as the notorious "cytokine storm.")

Active components of Elderberry include flavonoids, triterpenes, volatile oil, sterols, tannins, mucilage, minerals, vitamins A, C, and K, iron, sambucin, anthocyanosides, pectin, sugar, linoleic and linolenic oils.


*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 




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