Horehound (Marrubium vulgare) Cut and Sifted, Certified Organic





Description

USA. Horehound (Marrubium vulgare), Cut and Sifted, Certified Organic

Common names: White Horehound, Hoarhound, Marvel, Adorn, Hashishat Al Kalib,  Itsinegiotu, Pharasiyun, Malrove, Marrubio, Haran Haran, Niga-Hakka, Qutainah, Mapiochin

Family: Lamiaceae

Horehound is a flowering perennial plant, growing 10-18 inches tall, that originated in temperate areas of Eurasia and northern Africa, and has spread to many other regions of the world. It is found in waste places, fields, and along roadsides, preferring sunny conditions and dry, sandy soil.

Horehound, known to herbalists since ancient times, is one of the bitter herbs that Jews eat at Passover. Its flavor is considered pleasant and it is used in hard candies and cough drops and syrups. It is well known as a lung herb, helping to clear hoarseness and chest congestion and reduce spasms in coughs, colds, bronchitis, chronic sore throat, and asthma. Horehound liquefies dry sticky mucus, making it easier to expel.

Horehound is said to promote sweating, bringing fevers down, and urination, reducing excess water in the body. Other traditional uses target the digestive system and liver: stimulating the appetite; relieving acid reflux, constipation, and gas; regulating diabetes; expelling worms; and helping jaundice, hepatitis, and gall bladder disorders. It has also been used topically for wounds, shingles, and skin conditions, and for hypertension.

A significant body of published research supports many of the traditional claims for Horehound’s benefits, attributed to its flavonoid, alkaloid, phenolic acid, and other components. Many studies focus on marubiin, an abundant anti-inflammatory diterpene in Horehound, with documented antinociceptive, antioxidant, antigenotoxic, cardioprotective, vasorelaxant, gastroprotective, antispasmodic, immunomodulating, antioedematogenic, analgesic, and antidiabetic properties.

Other experiments use simple aqueous infusions of the whole herb—essentially, Horehound tea—or other extracts, and demonstrate additional effects including enhanced wound healing, preventing ulcers, anthelmintic activity, and actions against melanoma, glioma, and colorectal cancer cells.

Horehound should be avoided during pregnancy.

 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 



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